Where Do We Go?

...but each day gets better

51 notes

98 Plays
Ella Fitzgerald and the Ink Spots
I'm Making Believe

medicalstate:

I’m Making Believe by Ella Fitzgerald and the Ink Spots.

The day is over and the weekend has started. It is time to put on some music to help put me in a relaxing mood.

Hmmm… music.

309 notes

putthison:

Fake Deals
Medium has a story today on the less-than-honest business practices of discount and outlet stores. An excerpt: 

Despite common belief, outlet clothing never enters a “regular” store and is most likely produced in an entirely different factory than the “regular” clothing. A few months ago I met with some people from Banana Republic Outlet. Banana Republic has a team of people whose sole responsibility is to design and manage production for their outlet stores. Their production team was looking for new ways to diversify their outlet product-line in order to compete with H&M and Zara. It is rumored that these huge retailers have such agile supply-chains that they are able to bring new product to their stores every 2 weeks. While Banana Republic and J.Crew are not trying to compete on price with H&M, their outlet counterparts must. This means that these companies produce lower cost and lower quality clothing specifically for their outlet stores.
[…]
TJ Maxx, known for it’s off-price designer labels, finds itself in a similar position. Ever notice that TJ’s will have a surplus of Calvin Klein, or Rachel Roy, or Elie Tahari clothing? This happens when TJ Maxx brokers a licensing deal with one of these brands. In this situation, the brand (ex: Calvin Klein) agrees to let TJ Maxx produce clothing with their label on it in return for a percentage, usually between 5-20% of the wholesale price of the garment. To put this in perspective, in 2012 Calvin Klein reported that “licensed products currently represent slightly over 50% of global retail sales.” At that time, licensing alone accounted for more than $3.8 billion in CK sales.
Licensing can be a great situation for the brand because they do not have to manage sourcing, production, or shipping. TJ Maxx, or the licensee, manages all of the nitty-gritty stuff, and makes the product in their factories at prices that they control. Then, they put the reputable brand label on the clothing and write that company a check. These branded garments end up at discount retailers and consumers buy them thinking that they’ve just scored an awesome Calvin Klein blazer.

You can read the rest of the article here. To figure out which outlet stores are worth visiting, you can read Jesse’s post from four years ago (as far as I know, all those recommendations are still good). He also has a great post on diffusion lines and licensed clothing. 

Cool to read about how stuff is made and sold.

putthison:

Fake Deals

Medium has a story today on the less-than-honest business practices of discount and outlet stores. An excerpt: 

Despite common belief, outlet clothing never enters a “regular” store and is most likely produced in an entirely different factory than the “regular” clothing. A few months ago I met with some people from Banana Republic Outlet. Banana Republic has a team of people whose sole responsibility is to design and manage production for their outlet stores. Their production team was looking for new ways to diversify their outlet product-line in order to compete with H&M and Zara. It is rumored that these huge retailers have such agile supply-chains that they are able to bring new product to their stores every 2 weeks. While Banana Republic and J.Crew are not trying to compete on price with H&M, their outlet counterparts must. This means that these companies produce lower cost and lower quality clothing specifically for their outlet stores.

[…]

TJ Maxx, known for it’s off-price designer labels, finds itself in a similar position. Ever notice that TJ’s will have a surplus of Calvin Klein, or Rachel Roy, or Elie Tahari clothing? This happens when TJ Maxx brokers a licensing deal with one of these brands. In this situation, the brand (ex: Calvin Klein) agrees to let TJ Maxx produce clothing with their label on it in return for a percentage, usually between 5-20% of the wholesale price of the garment. To put this in perspective, in 2012 Calvin Klein reported that “licensed products currently represent slightly over 50% of global retail sales.” At that time, licensing alone accounted for more than $3.8 billion in CK sales.

Licensing can be a great situation for the brand because they do not have to manage sourcing, production, or shipping. TJ Maxx, or the licensee, manages all of the nitty-gritty stuff, and makes the product in their factories at prices that they control. Then, they put the reputable brand label on the clothing and write that company a check. These branded garments end up at discount retailers and consumers buy them thinking that they’ve just scored an awesome Calvin Klein blazer.

You can read the rest of the article here. To figure out which outlet stores are worth visiting, you can read Jesse’s post from four years ago (as far as I know, all those recommendations are still good). He also has a great post on diffusion lines and licensed clothing

Cool to read about how stuff is made and sold.

3 notes

dennisshem:

Some photos from this past week!

Sundays are my days off from training. And today, I had the opportunity after going to church with my host family, to eat lunch at the local Chinese buffet. Being from the SF Bay Area, I knew going in that the food wasn’t going to be that great, and it certainly lived up to that expectation. It had a very… casino hotel buffet type feel, which certainly added to my amusement being there. It also upset my stomach a bit. All in all, I think I got the full experience there.

On top of that, I learned how to fire a shotgun and also had the opportunity to shoot some clay pigeons over my host family’s corn field. I nailed 4/5 on my first round of shooting ever! Felt pretty awesome afterwards (and a bit sore in the shoulder).

Lastly, music practice has been going well, with plenty of ups and downs. We’re learning and being challenged to emit more of a stage presence, which is hard when you don’t exactly have all the songs memorized yet and still have to think about them— and when you think you look foolish trying to hype up rows of empty pews. In spite of that, it’s been fun enjoying playing music with others.

Many of you want to know more details about what I’ll be doing in Singapore. The honest answer: whatever it is Singapore YFC (the ministry we’re assisting) wants us to do. So far, it’s meant taking a lot of group photos like the ones I’m posting, which are meant to promote the concert we’ll be playing. In the future, it might mean going on stage and embarrassing ourselves with our lack of Singlish knowledge, playing coffee shop sets, leading worship at different small groups, or even just helping move and pass out fliers. Though we might only be playing at most 5 full-band concerts, it’s all good. We’re going abroad for the sake of the Gospel, to aid the local ministry in their efforts to reach those who don’t know about Jesus, giving them a chance to hear and respond.

Blogging my CTI missions trip here. Got to do some exciting things today :)

3 notes

Inside the Mirrortocracy

There’s a problem with Silicon Valley and the subcultures that imitate it. It’s a design bug woven into people’s identities and sense of self-worth. Fixing it will be painful. Influential and otherwise very smart people will deny till their last breath that it even exists. But I believe it should be fixed before it gets any worse.

This aptly explains so much of what upsets me about tech and startup culture that I couldn’t really explain. And what he describes is applicable to so many of the other groups we find ourselves in.

(Source: lx)